Depression and anxiety are terms we often throw around loosely but they truly can be debilitating. When you suffer from major depression, you often can’t function well enough to eat or even shower. You have suicidal thoughts and perhaps can’t bring yourself to go to work. Dysthymia, which is a low level depression, is impactful as well, and often goes unrecognized because the individual can still complete daily tasks.

Anxiety can also be an exhausting disorder. The restless and often panicked feeling one has can make someone feel like they are going crazy! Panic attacks are terrifying and you can feel as if you are going to die.

Whatever level of anxiety or depression you have, cognitive behavior therapy can assist you. We often need to find new ways to soothe and develop better coping skills in life. Sometimes, but not always, medication may be indicated. I can help guide you in resolving your depression and anxiety. In therapy, I work with clients to look back at their families of origin to understand current patterns of behavior, and then move into the present to improve coping skills and make positive behavioral changes .

A major depressive episode may include these symptoms:

  • Persistent sad, anxious or “empty” mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities, including sex
  • Decreased energy, fatigue, feeling “slowed down”
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning awakening, or oversleeping
  • Low appetite and weight loss or overeating and weight gain
  • Thoughts of death or suicide, suicide attempts
  • Restlessness, irritability
  • Persistent physical symptoms that do not respond to treatment, such as headaches, digestive disorders and pain for which no other cause can be diagnosed.

Physical symptoms of anxiety can include the following:

  • muscle tension
  • fatigue
  • restlessness
  • difficulty sleeping
  • irritability
  • edginess